ILLINOIS FARM FAMILIES CAN PROVIDE A VIRTUAL FARM EXPERIENCE, BUT REAL RELATIONSHIPS AND CONVERSATIONS

You’ve heard it a million times…farmers should tell their story.

Maybe you’ve tried to tell your story. Maybe you figure someone else has done it for you. Either way, I’m here to tell you that telling your story isn’t good enough anymore.

Now’s the time to have a conversation about you, your family, and your farm. Even more, it’s time to ask questions, listen to the answers, find common ground, and establish a community based on an enhanced understanding of each other’s needs, wants, concerns, hopes, and aspirations.

And yes, I’m asking you to do this in person and (gasp) online using social media applications like Facebook, twitter, blogs, etc.

There’s nothing magical about social media or conversations of any kind. It just takes two people who are genuinely interested in learning, sharing, and establishing a broader understanding.

The risk of not participating in these types of conversations is that you and your farm and your way of life may become irrelevant. There’s no need to re-hash this argument…you know what I’m talking about. It’s the movies, books, and news stories that are “filled with misinformation” as those of us in agriculture are so apt to describe it. Well, we describe it that way to each other, more than anyone else.

Yes, that was a nice way of saying let’s quit preaching to the choir.

Are you ready to get involved? Good, because we’re ready to help you.

Through an effort funded in part by the Illinois Corn Marketing Board (your corn checkoff), free training is available to share with interested farmers, agribusiness professionals, and/ or their family members to become part of a network of go-to people representing agriculture.

Join the movement of Farmers Opening Our Doors (FOOD). FOOD was developed by a coalition of the five largest Illinois farm groups. We’ve made a commitment to openly share with consumers what really happens on Illinois farms and answer consumers’ questions about how their food is grown and raised. While they may not like every answer, at least from us, consumers will get the honest truth about their food.

Training seminars are scheduled for Bloomington, DeKalb, Marion and Quincy with all locations scheduled in February.

For more information about getting involved, or to register for the training, please email me at tbraid@ilcorn.org.

Tricia Braid
ICGA/ICMB Communications Director

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