TWO THINGS TO DO BEFORE YOU READ A FOOD ARTICLE ON SOCIAL MEDIA

We could spend hours talking about the incredible and often ridiculous food information that is thrown our way on social media. From dieting how-tos to organic eating guides, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter are chock-full of information about food. As consumers and social media-frequenters, it is especially important to be critical of the quantity and quality of information that is being placed in front of us. If you ever come across a food-related article, keep these pointers in mind:

  1. Ask, “Where is this information coming from?”

So let’s do an example. The title of one such article is “Research Indicates That GMO Could Be a Cause of Infertility.” What’s the name of the article’s publishing website? Natural Fertility Info. There are links to the site’s all-natural (which are heavily promoted as “all-natural”) products such as a Fertility Cleanse Kits and a Self-Fertility Massage DVD. If a concerned couple were to click on this article and read it, they may begin to panic about GMO consumption.  Maybe they are experiencing infertility. Now, after reading this article, they will not only second-guess their GMO consumption but also shop around for “all-natural” products. We have to be critical of the motivations behind websites.

As an additional example, this article addresses the problem behind relying on sources that seem to be credible because they focus on a certain issue. This article caught my attention, because I am genuinely interested to watch the organic farming industry expand. It is something different and I know that it takes a great deal of hard work. I found that it is on a website titled “GMWatch.” I wandered over to the “About” page and the site claims to “provide the public with the latest news and comment on genetically modified (GMO) foods and crops.” However, in the very next paragraph, the website says, “GMWatch is an independent organization that seeks to counter the enormous corporate political power and propaganda of the GMO industry and its supporters.” Which of the two is the actual goal of the site?  Does GMWatch want to find airtight truths about GMOs or do they want to bring down the GMO industry? If this site truly wanted to shed light on the GMO industry, they should have a much more unbiased profile. Therefore, we have to be critical of the credibility of the sources we get information from.

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  1. Be wary of absolutes.

“Always.” “Never.” These are common terms that pop up on my Facebook feed.  Absolutes have a way of providing people with a false sense of security. “If you never eat this, you will be healthy.” “If you do eat this, your healthy diet will definitely be ruined.” This article is a perfect example of using absolutes in order to persuade the reader through threats. No, Pop Tarts and fast food meals are probably not the best for children. However, parents should not feel ashamed to give their kids a treat every once in a while. Sometimes, it is okay to eat something just because it tastes good. When I was growing up, Pop Tarts were a luxury because they were so sugary and delicious. They were not regular staples in our diets. They were treats! Completely banishing any food from a child’s diet (allergies and other health conditions excluded) sends the message that “If you eat this food, you will not be a ‘healthy’ person.” This is not the message that we should be sending the kiddos. We all need to lead healthy, balanced lives and living balanced means treating yourself every now and then!

anna

 

Anna Toohill
University of Illinois

 

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