GROWERS’ GRATITUDE

Harvest is upon us and that means that the farmers have begun their endless days of work. You have probably been spotting the floating lights in the fields from the combines running hours after dark.  You will see the once towering corn fields cut down to reveal the soil they’ve been growing in for months with only a short nub of a stalk left to show that something grew there.

What you won’t be seeing is the families back at home running meals out to those fields for the farmers. You won’t see the missed birthdays, missed sports games, and lack of family dinners. You won’t see the broken-hearted farmer that had to finish early for the night because a piece of machinery broke and they don’t have the part to fix it.

What you won’t see are a farmer’s kids “corn swimming” in the back of the semi-trucks. What you won’t see is the bright smile of a wife welcoming her husband come home in the early hours of the morning. What you won’t see are the sleepy faces of a farmer’s kids after riding around in combines all day. What you won’t see are the laughs and smiles of farming families gathered around a table on Thanksgiving sharing good memories despite the hard work they’ve all been through the past weeks of harvest.

When it comes to life, the critical thing is whether you take things for granted or take them with gratitude.” –Gilbert K. Chesterton

When it comes to harvest, the whole family is involved in one way or another. They celebrate that extra acre they got done last night and they all get heavy hearts when the machinery breaks down. They do not take their time together during this season for granted. “Harvest is always an incredibly busy time of year for farm families. There are a lot of sacrifices made and not much free time but it all is worth it when you can see what comes from all the hard work” states Jennifer Lindstrom, a farmer’s wife from central Illinois. Growers put their hearts and souls into their farms. A farm is a farmer’s way of life rather than a job and the sacrifices that come with that are immense. There are no holidays or set vacation days. However, any farm family would tell you they would not give it up for the world.

Coming from a small farm, it gives me great hope and pride to see other family farms thrive as well as be appreciated. I have grown up experiencing all that goes into the growing seasons, year after year, and it has taught me how to be grateful for what we accomplish as well as how to adapt to the unexpected roadblocks. There is a lot of work that goes into maintaining your own farm. The long hours, the hard labor, and the mental toll that goes into it make growers nothing short of superheroes. I am grateful for the sacrifices each farm family makes during this time, as well as thankful for the memories that strengthen their family bond.

Maddi Lindstrom
University of Illinois

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