APRIL SHOWERS BRING UNIQUE FARMER SUPERPOWERS

April showers bring May flowers – a saying we have all heard at least once in our lives. This spring we have certainly had plenty of showers, both rain, and snow! With all this spring rain, it is important to consider the impact all this excess water may have on our fields. Let’s chat about some of the best management practices farmers use to counteract the spring rain overload.

First up, we’ve got nutrient loss prevention. Just like our bodies require certain nutrients to grow and thrive, soil also has specific needs in order to best support our crops.

There are three main nutrients found in soil: nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. A unique combination of all three creates a recipe for success to have a fruitful harvest. Too much rain causes these nutrients to become depleted from the soil, and often times can run into bodies of water. To prevent nutrient loss and water contamination, farmers utilize strategies such as monitoring critical bodies of water, as well as using research and improved technology advancements to minimize the impact. In Illinois specifically, we mainly work to reduce the loss of nitrogen and phosphorus from our fields.

Another management strategy our farmers use is reduced tillage for erosion control. Let’s start by defining soil erosion: it is the natural degrading of the physical top layer of soil, which can happen from wind, water, etc. Why is this bad? Because as we discussed earlier, the soil has a very specific balance of nutrients. By removing the top layer of soil, it has a large impact on the quality of soil and results in decreased yields per acre. Some techniques farmers utilize include various machinery that moves less soil and results in less chance of soil erosion. Using less invasive equipment while still properly caring for the fields helps farmers avoid soil erosion.

Finally, let’s talk about cover crops. What exactly is a cover crop? It is an off-season planting of a different type of crop. For example, in the summer we typically see corn and soybeans grown in Illinois. After fall harvest, many farmers may plant crops such as oats or wheat. Why plant more after just finishing a tedious summer harvest? Because planting different species in the same field will help return those vital nutrients to the soil, and help the field prepare for the next spring planting.

These management practices are just some of many that agriculturalists use all over the world. The next time we have an April shower, as we put on our rain boots, let’s remember how it impacts our fields, and what our farmers are doing to best manage our land.

Susie Thompson
Illinois State University

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