WHY GLOBAL AGRICULTURAL TRADE AFFECTS YOU

Photo by Erwan Hesry on Unsplash

Do you remember that one thing you loved as a kid? Everyone else may have looked at it thinking it was silly. Maybe looking back, you do too, but, at the time, it meant the world to you. Twelve years ago, I found myself in the middle of a dramatic discussion about my one thing. This group of 8 or 9 kids would get together every day and argue to the point that people weren’t sure whether or not we were all friends. So, what was so important that 3rd graders were upset and that, at one time, were sent to the principal’s office?

Trade.

We’d gather in the gym, each with two or three LEGOs, hoping to trade for the one figure we needed. The ones everyone wanted were Star Wars characters (obviously), followed by aliens, and this little LEGO monkey we called Norm. Looking back, this is one of those things I view as silly. Even though our group eventually got shut down, we still practiced some trading basics.

If you have flipped on the T.V. in past months, you’ve likely heard of the trade war. Trade is very important for many people and has serious implications for many sectors, especially agriculture. According to the USDA, 20% of a farmer’s income is the result of global trade. With all that on the line, here’s a rundown of what trade issues are concerning people.

NAFTA

The North American Free Trade Agreement is the largest trade deal in the world. This deal between the United States, Canada, and Mexico was unlike anything we’d seen prior. Every state (except for Wyoming and Kentucky) trades at least $10 million worth of goods every year because of NAFTA. Just here in Illinois, over $2 million of ag goods are shipped to Mexico and Canada each year. To read more about each state’s relationship with NAFTA check out this Iowa State Publication.

TPP

The Trans-Pacific Partnership is a trade deal that got a lot of people in agriculture excited. Expanding and increasing exports of ag goods is something that could pick up a down ag economy. The deal was set to involve twelve countries that border the Pacific Ocean. The deal was never ratified. Then, last year the U.S. pulled out of the deal. Now the remaining countries are still in negotiations under the name Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership. Even though we withdrew from TPP, recent talks have mentioned the U.S. rejoining. If that happens, net farm income could increase by $6 billion (Michigan Farm Bureau). The renegotiated deal is expected to be signed soon allowing the United States to join later.

China

One of the hottest topics in trade has been the escalating discussions between the U.S. and China. According to the USDA, China is the second largest importer of U.S. ag products totaling $19.6 billion. With that much on the line, it is very important to agriculture that we continue to trade with China or find other markets to sell our products.

What a Regression in Trade Would Mean

The U.S. produces more food than we can use. So, we sell what food is left over. As I learned in 3rd grade making deals, to sell a product, someone must be willing to buy it. Ideally, many people will want to buy it (like Norm the LEGO monkey) and the seller can charge a higher price because of its value to so many people (I grossly overpaid for that monkey). If the U.S. successfully does creates a condition where many countries want U.S. ag products, the economy grows healthier. Additionally, when farmers receive fair prices and make money, they can invest in machinery, seed, technology, and practices that result in a healthier and safer food supply. This further stimulates the ag economy.

These reasons are just a few on the list of why trade is so important to farmers.

JC Campbell
Legislative Intern
Illinois Corn Growers Association

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