FRIDAY FARM PHOTO

We’re finding all kinds of ways to share information about corn and the family farmers that grow it at The Corn Crib, professional baseball’s newest ballpark. The Corn Crib is home to the Normal CornBelters. If you visit you’ll see messages like this one, reminding non-farmers that their friends and neighbors are the family farmers producing Illinois’ highest valued crop. If you sit through a game, you’ll hear conversations about corn and farmers happening between people that otherwise never would have talked about corn. Spontaneous shouts of “Let’s Go Corn!” echo through the stands, and Corny, the CornBelters mascot, is high-fived wherever he goes. It’s opportunities like this that can make a huge difference as more and more challenges to agriculture are being promulgated by detractors.

AMERICAN CORN FARMERS FIND CONSENSUS

During the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) Corn Congress, corn farmers from 28 states came together in our nation’s capitol to debate issues and set policy for the organization.  The highlight of the week was the election of four members of the NCGA Board, one of which was our own Rob Elliott of Cameron, IL!  Pictured above is Paul Taylor (row 1, fourth from left) and Bill Christ (row 2) who represented Illinois during policy discussions at Corn Congress.
Of course, as mentioned earlier this week, we also visited with every member of Congress (or their staff) and both Senators while in Washington, ensuring that they understand the business of corn farming, the need for markets, and the sustainability of American corn farmers.

ETHANOL EFFICIENCIES FUEL A GREEN REVOLUTION

During a recent tour of Illinois River Energy in Rochelle, IL, the Illinois Corn Marketing Board and staff learned about new and innovative techniques to produce ethanol that lesson the energy requirement and create more valuable co-products.  Corn-based ethanol gets more and more efficient every day!
Did you see in this recent study by Stanford University, the researchers determined that high yield agriculture prevented the equivalent of 590 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide from entering the atmosphere?  According to the researchers, their results, “Dispel the notion that modern intensive agriculture is inherently worse for the environment than a more ‘old-fashioned’ way of doing things.”
High yield agriculture is good for the environment.  And these higher yields are what is producing enough corn to fuel our countries green-energy revolution.