#TBT: LIVING THE SIMPLE LIFE

Gpa working on planterIt is very easy to get caught up in the rat race of life. Don’t be afraid to step off that wheel and set your own pace. That is your best chance a living a happy, successful life. Here are a few ways to live a life that isn’t more complicated than it has to be.

Kids looking at chickens

You don’t have to reinvent the wheel. If something works well, but isn’t perfect, don’t start from scratch. Just try to improve what you already have. You’ll save yourself a lot of time, energy, and stress.

Farmer tending to cattle

Remember that you are working hard for the next generation. Show them who you are by your actions. They will follow your example; set a good one.

Find a job that you love and it will never feel like work. If you manage that, no matter how much you make at the end of the day; you’re rich.

kid showing cattleDon’t ever stop learning or trying to be your best. Even if you fail, you’ll know what you can improve on for the next time. Challenges build character and will make you a better individual.

chickNever stop appreciating the beauty of your life. Not everyone has the chance to spend their day working with their hands and following their dreams. Plus, you get to spend a lot of time with chicks.

Kids in tractor

Don’t worry about going fast. There is nothing wrong with taking it slow. Ask any farm kid and they will tell you that this is the best ride they have ever been on. 

 

nicole yorkNicole York
Southern Illinois University Carbondale

IF YOU GIVE A FARMER A REQUEST

If you give a farmer a request, he is going to follow through. In 1985, If You Give A Mouse A Cookie by Laura Joffe Numeroff was published and detailed the endless track of chores that might occur if you gave a needy mouse a cookie. This trouble is not quite what ensues when you give a farmer a request, but you can almost guarantee your requests might become endless of him. Here are a few requests we all have asked of farmers over the years.

  1. If you ask a farmer for a tow, he is going to pull you out. Whether is it getting pulled out of snowy road bank or a muddy road, a farmer will be quick to lend a hand with his truck or tractor. Last time I got my dad’s jeep stuck on the dirt road, I had a list of people I was ready to call before my dad ever had to know.
  2. If you ask a farmer for a for a ride, he is going to give you a lift. To the next town, down the road, or the field to pick up your truck, a farmer will do what he can to help you out. The only stipulation is that he might expect you to return the favor. I know I have had a neighbor or two knocks on my door and ask if I have time to take him to his truck in the field down the road.
  3. If you ask a farmer for advice, he is going to give you a wise word. Whether you need advice on what crops to plant in a field or how to make up with a friend over a conflict, a farmer will always lend his wisdom. Farmers are often wiser than their years because they have been caring for other animals and plants that depend on them for life. In my life, rarely have the wise words of a farmer led me astray.
  4. If you ask a farmer for a hand, he is going to lend on. Farming is not only an industry that revolves around family but community. Whether it’s finishing up harvest in time or volunteering to cook at a school fundraiser, a farmer will always lend a hand. In anything I am doing, I know my farmer support system is just a phone call away.
  5. If you ask a farmer to feed you, he already is. Farming feeds the world. Farmers produce that feed with all the energy and love that they put into feeding their own family. I have watched these men and women work their days and nights away doing what they love and I know there is no job more underappreciated but more rewarding than a farmer.

Shelby Carlson
IL Corn Communications Intern

WILL FARMERS GO BROKE IN 2017?

Every once in a while, I check in on some of the most frequently asked questions about farmers on Google.  I’m always surprised.

While the day-to-day tasks of my job always lead me to believe that people are interested in GMO’s, organic food production, trade, and other important topics, turns out that people really care about how much money farmers are making.

You might start out by reading a couple of these.  They are going to help you understand an average Illinois farmer’s balance sheet.
ARE FARMERS RICH IN 2017?
ARE FARMERS RICH?
ARE FARMERS RICH? UPDATED!!

But to answer the overall question of farmers, how much money they make, and if their cries about profitability have any weight, check out this graph:

This graph is basically showing us that after adjusting for inflation, farmers are making considerably less money than they used to make.  Look at the depression years!  Farmers are making less net profit right now than they were making in the 1920s and 1930s.

It’s definitely an eye opener.

As for the immediate question, will farmers be going broke in 2017?  I think the answer is no.  We will not see farmers declaring bankruptcy in droves this year.  The thing about farmers is that they are good at saving for a rainy day, so most can weather this downturn.

But what’s helping them withstand this low price period is good farm programs, good crop insurance, and good marketing opportunities.  What we can’t do is forsake programs to help farmers weather bad years and bad prices because we perceive them getting rich.

Lindsay Mitchell
ICGA/ICMB Marketing Director

 

SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS TO FOLLOW

If you’re interested in ag and you’d like to have real news and updates delivered to your Facebook or Twitter feed, then these are the social media accounts to follow!

 

Farm Babe

Farm Babe works on the family farm and uses social media to bridge the gap between Farmers & consumers. She is a writer and public speaker for agriculture.

Michelle Miller was once a big city girl and moved to rural Iowa for love. Once there, she learned that her original thoughts of Modern agriculture were very inaccurate (based on mainstream Hollywood media and marketing) and now enjoys debunking myths and spreading facts about REAL Farms from REAL farmers.

CropLife America

If you’re interested in more information about chemicals, why farmers use them, and a more balanced viewpoint, CropLife America is your stop.  CLA’s member companies produce, sell and distribute virtually all the crop protection and biotechnology products used by American farmers.

CLA is dedicated to supporting responsible stewardship of our products to promote the health and well-being of people and the environment, and to promote increasingly responsible, science-driven legislation and regulation of pesticides.

The Pollinator Partnership

We protect the habitats of managed and native pollinating animals vital to our incredibly vibrant North American ecosystems and agriculture. (Pollinating animals are responsible for an estimated one out of every third bite of food and over 75% of all flowering plants.) 

Dairy Carrie

I never thought I’d be a dairy farmer. I grew up in Madison, WI with no real ties to agriculture. I WAS the average American, generations removed from the farm. Then one day when I was 15 I met a guy…and started dating his friend. Fast forward several years and more questionable dating choices and I married the guy I met all those years ago. He wasn’t a dairy farmer (at the time) but his parents were.

My background was in sales and marketing, but my love of animals drew me to trying out farm life shortly after we got married. It stuck and I found out that I was born to be a caretaker of cows and the land.

Waterways Council Inc

Because we talk about needing upgraded locks and dams A LOT and these guys are the authority on what exactly farmers need, why they need it, and how we’re going to get it.

Waterways Council represents agriculture, the barge industry, and even the conservation community who are all working together to restore our river system to its former commerce and habitat glory.

 GMO Answers

Many of you are interested in GMOs in your food and what impact they might have for you and for the environment.

The goal of GMOAnswers is to make information about GMOs in food and agriculture easier to access and understand. GMOAnswers is committed to answering questions about GMOs — no matter what they are.

 

YES, WE JUDGE

Last weekend I went home for our annual 4-H fair. I cannot begin to tell you how much I looked forward to this week as a kid. Now, I have been out of the 4-H program for three years, but I have yet to miss a fair. I served as a secretary for the general project show, helped weigh in animals, and helped keep the cattle and pig shows running smoothly just as I have done since I had aged out of the 4-H program.

Early Saturday morning, I arrived caffeine in-hand, to wait for the judge I had worked with in years past. I have already confirmed I would be working with him again and was pleased. Our project area was one I enjoyed and made for interesting conversation. The retired agriculture teacher and I would be judging the 4-Hers on small engines, tractors, and crops.

We quickly set up our table and didn’t have to wait long before a line of kids holding posters formed. This was a typical sight for the fair and resembled a classroom science fair. Nothing was that unusual. Then came the corn. 4-Hers carried five-gallon buckets with corn sticking out of the top into the school hallway we were using as our fairgrounds this year. What a sight these makeshift vases made with their collection proudly displayed made leaning against the wall.

4-H members sat one at a time and answered the judge’s questions about what type of seed the corn plants came from when they planted their crop when they would harvest if they had experienced as problems with bugs or disease, ideal weather for the corn, and anything else. Some of the younger members answered with questioning hesitation while older ones rattled off the answers. All the while I noted that these were the producers of the tomorrow.

Yes, we judged these kids. They were at the fair not only to learn but to compete for the top corn crop. It is important to the future or agriculture that tough questions continued to be asked of the industry. Things can’t always be done “the way our parents did it” because technology is changing as quickly as the weather.  Yes, we judged. All the kids received acknowledgment for their effort. A top few will go on to the state fair. The 4-Hers were asked questions they should be asking themselves, questions consumers want and deserve the answer to. The 4-Hers did not let me down. I don’t worry about the future of agriculture as long as we have youth stepping up to be judged. We will be fine.

Shelby Carlson
IL Corn Communication Intern

REGARDLESS OF THE LABEL, DAIRY IS LOCAL

[Originally published from Illinois Farm Families]

Our family has been farming in central Illinois for more than 150 years and shipping our milk to local bottling plants for distribution in surrounding communities. We’re just one of many dairy farms across the country – in fact there are dairy farms in all 50 states shipping milk to neighborhood stores and markets, making dairy a true local food!

So what does it take to bring you some local goodness? Well, every day, regardless of birthdays, weddings, graduations or weather, our alarm sounds long before the sun comes up. We milk our cows twice a day and on average, each cow spends about eight minutes in the milking parlor – five of those minutes with the milking units attached. Our milk is cooled down to 38 degrees until the milk hauler comes to the farm. Then our milk is transported to the Prairie Farms bottling plant in Peoria, Ill. Testing is done for quality and safety before the milk is pasteurized, homogenized and bottled. Milk offers great nutrition with a lean source of protein, Vitamins A, D and calcium, just to name a few.

About 48 hours after the milk leaves our farm, it arrives on your store shelves and then on your dinner table!

We all want to sit around the dinner table and feed our family fresh food grown and raised by local farmers. It’s a concept that has recently been rebranded as “farm to table” but has actually been around for a very long time. On my family’s dairy farm, we are proud to say that with our without a “local” label, we have been providing the highest quality milk for our community for more than five generations. So, pour yourself a cold glass of milk or enjoy a heaping bowl of ice cream and know it came from a local farmer just a few days earlier.

MARY FABER

Mary raises dairy cattle and grain with her husband, Jesse, and two children in central Illinois. Mary’s great-grandfather started the dairy farm over 150 years ago with just a handful of cows. Today, her family continues to live and farm on those original acres. Farming is a history and a passion for Mary and her family!

I NEVER PAID MUCH ATTENTION TO CORN

Last night I took the long familiar drive home with added company in my car. I had fellow Corn Intern, Kylie, and her roommate in the car with me and we were making casual conversation about our days at work. The three of us are friends outside of work but come from various backgrounds that all led us to the University of Illinois agriculture program.

As we drove, the conversation began to lull and from the back-seat Kylie offered, “You know, I never really paid much attention to corn until I started my internship.” The sentence took me a bit off guard before she continued, “Of course we had some corn, but it was just there.” I understood what she meant, but to me, corn had never “just been there.”

Continued reflection on the topic had me curious how one could just assume corn was nothing more than passing scenery on the interstate. It was so much more than that to everyone I knew growing up and I have never known anything different. Corn was never “just there”, it was seed selected carefully, planting done late into the night praying the rain held off, then praying for rain a few weeks later. Corn was your classmate or teacher missing an afternoon because the field really needed to be picked and someone had to get it done. No, corn wasn’t “just there”.

I then thought about how the office had reacted the recent rain we had got. It was easy to tell who had been raised with farmers and whose family farm was in what parts of the state. Some were quick to groan at the thought of more water in their already sodden fields while many rejoiced at the chance for their plants to get a drink. All of the meaning was lost on Kylie, she had never paid much attention to corn. She didn’t know what the year of the drought was like. To her, the corn was still “just there”.

After having slept on the subject, I have reached a new mentality. Most people will never pay attention to the corn along the side of the roads. They will not see the food, fuel, and fiber that keeps the country turning, the backbone of the American economy, the pride of Illinois, they will see corn. That’s okay. It would be impossible to ask Kylie to appreciate corn in ways that I do, she wasn’t raised with corn as her nearest neighbor. Rather than be annoyed, upset, or frustrated, I am inspired. The fact that others think corn is “just there” means that I get to be corn’s voice. Those in agriculture have a passion that can’t be squelched. Share that passion. Spread the word. Others don’t have to pay attention to corn as long as you do.

Shelby Carlson
IL Corn Intern

CAUTION WHEN DRIVING!

It’s getting to that time of the year where the corn is growing a mile per minute. With advancements in technology, corn is growing quicker and taller sooner than ever before. With these advancements, we wanted to caution drivers who are cruising the countryside to be very aware of their surroundings.

  1. Drive the Speed Limit

People tend to think that their vehicle magically becomes a racecar when going down a country road. With corn growing there becomes a huge visibility issue and it’s harder to see other drivers on different roads. Go the speed limit because you have no idea what might or how fast things down other roads can be going.

  1. Slow down at every corner, even if there is no stop sign

Like I just said, when corn is growing there becomes a huge visibility issue. Even if there is not a stop sign at every corner decrease your speed or even stop. Many people feel the need to roll through stop signs in the country, even when the corn is high. Be the proactive person and ensure everyone’s safety and slow down at every corner and intersection you can.

  1. Use caution & double check when you see equipment coming down the road

Though it is not the time for harvest right now, it will be soon. Ground Rigs are still able to get into the fields and before we know it harvesting equipment will be roaming the country roads more. Lots of this equipment takes up space that fills up the whole road. Most of this equipment is also designed to go a lot slower than your average vehicle. Most farmers try to be courteous to others not in equipment and allow them to pass when it’s safe for both of them. Before passing the equipment ALWAYS DOUBLE CHECK to see if there is anything coming. Sometimes farmers are just getting over to let oncoming traffic through.

Though you should always be cautious while driving anywhere, please be extra cautious during this, and any other corn-growing season!

Abby Jacobs
Illinois State University