#TBT: LETTER OF APPRECIATION: FROM A FARMER’S DAUGHTER

[Originally published March 4, 2014]

Dear Farmer – more specifically – Dad,

Hollands 006Growing up on a family farm, life wasn’t always easy or ‘fair’.  I wasn’t able to run down the street to play with my friends after school or on many weekends like the rest of the kids in my class.  You expected me to be at home helping in the garden, in the field mowing hay, or in the pasture checking cows.  And you didn’t pay me for doing these things.  If I wanted to buy something extra, then I had to earn the money for it.  Summers of my youth were spent detasseling and baling hay.  Once I hit sixteen, I worked part-time outside of the farm.  You were always there for me and supplied me with the necessities, but if I wanted more, I was expected to earn it myself.

I wasn’t able to have all the coolest, up-to-date clothes that the other girls in my class sported.  Mom took us shopping at Farm & Fleet and we got the Wranglers that were on sale.  Boots were handed down from older siblings, it didn’t matter if they were boys or girls, we wore what fit.

While my town friends were sleeping in or watching Saturday morning cartoons, we were working cattle before the heat set in for the day.  Sometimes even being woke up in the middle of the night to round up loose cows.

You know what though… I wouldn’t change it for anything.  Life on the farm taught me many lessons that I have carried with me into adulthood.

  • Determination and Commitment – When I got bucked off a horse, the world didn’t stop turning for me, I had to get right back on and ride.  You taught me that when something isn’t going right, you don’t give up, you dig your heels in and finish the job.
  • Roll with the Punches –  Things don’t always go as expected on a farm… you’ve got a 30 acre field of hay cut and an unexpected thunderstorm rolls in, or a heifer is having problems calving at 2 in the morning, you’ve got to deal with the obstacles as they come at you, not everything can be done by the book…. Not so different than the hurdles I face in life now.
  • Caring – Farmers care about the welfare of their sources of livelihood – the livestock and the land – like no other profession I’ve ever come across.  You taught me this.  How many corporate folk do you know that would go out in the driving rain and sleet to help a downed cow?  I can’t name any.  That’s part of a farmer’s job though.  You care about the quality of life of your animals and that extends to caring about others as well.  When a neighboring farmer is going through a hard time and needs help getting the crops in, we helped.  You don’t stand by and watch others struggle, you do what you can to lift them up.
  • Respect – You taught me to respect my elders, the land and the animals we raised.  Without them, we wouldn’t have anything.
  • Be Independent and Work Hard– You can’t rely on others for everything.  You taught me that if I wanted something I had to work for it and do it myself.  There wasn’t going to be any magical Fairy Godmother to wave her wand and pay for my first car or my college tuition.  You taught me how to change a tire so I wouldn’t have to be stuck on the side of the road waiting for help.

This is just a short list of the things you taught me, but what I’m really trying to say is, thank you Dad, from the bottom of my heart.  I appreciate all the lessons learned and quality time spent together.   Without you and Mom showing me the ropes of farm life, I don’t think I would be the person I am today.  And to all the other farm parents who have created such an amazing environment in which to raise their families, you are appreciated.

Becky FinfrockBecky Finfrock
ICGA/ICMB Communications Assistant

 

 

AG WOMEN FIND COMMUNITY IN CONFERENCE

When someone thinks of a farmer, they often conjure up the most stereotypical Ole’ McDonald image: overalls, older, pitchfork, and a man. However, women put on farmer hats, as well, and take on many other roles within the agriculture industry.

Did you know that 44% of FFA members are female? That’s almost half of all FFA students! And we sure hope they stick around to continue to serve America’s farms within the ag industry. So in a traditionally male-dominated profession, how do ag women translate their passion for ag into a career?

Today, women in ag roles is nothing new or earth-shattering. There are numerous resources for women to explore and to network within the industry to find where they fit and to meet like-minded ladies. One such resource is the Women Changing the Face of Ag conference. According to WCFA:

“The Women Changing the Face of Agriculture conference is designed for young women in high school and college who are interested in a career in agriculture. Group registration is available for collegiate groups, FFA chapters, and 4-H clubs.”

Organized by Illinois Agri-Women (IAW)*, the Women Changing the Face of Agriculture conference is “an investment in the future of agriculture. This outreach project gives all women the opportunity to explore different career paths offered in the agriculture sector.  Our goal is to help attendees receive accurate information first hand from actual women agriculture professionals.”

Additionally, the conference has 200+ presenters that offer looks into careers that span the spectrum of ag, including:

  • Ag Business
  • Ag Education
  • Agronomy
  • Animal Science/Veterinary Medicine
  • Communications
  • Engineering
  • Environmental Science
  • Food Science
  • Law
  • Marketing
  • Natural Resource Conservation
  • And more!

So, if you’re a female ag enthusiast who just isn’t sure where her place in ag should be, we’d encourage you to learn more about this conference. Not only do you have the potential to find a future career, you might even meet some new lifelong friends along the way.

To learn more about the WCFA conference, visit the website.

*IAW is a grassroots organization of farm and agri-businesswomen promoting a better understanding of agriculture and the family farm system.  Our organization consists of members from across the state of Illinois who volunteer to promote agriculture.  To learn more about Illinois Agri-Women visit their website.

ALL WE WANT FOR CHRISTMAS: LOCKS & DAMS

 

[Originally posted December 12, 2016]

At this point, I sound like a broken record.  (And if you’re tired of hearing me talk about locks and dams, be glad you don’t know Jim Tarmann – an IL Corn staffer who has been working on this issue for 20ish years!)

Illinois farmers need updated locks and dams if the U.S. wants us to remain globally competitive.  There’s no ifs, ands, or buts about it.

WE NEED LOCKS AND DAMS!

We’re getting closer.  Congress has changed some funding equations and the industry (all the users of the river system) agreed to pay more in order to generate income to improve locks and dams.  This means that we’re closer than we’ve ever been and that’s exciting.

But we’re really REALLY hoping that Santa will whisper in the ears of the powers that be and include lock and dam construction in the potential transportation and infrastructure spending we keep hearing about in the new year.  This could be such a huge gain for IL agriculture!!

Want to learn more?  We’ve published some great articles on the need for upgraded locks and dams (click here).  Don’t forget, the locks and dams we’re using now were built in Mark Twain’s era for steam boats!!  At that time, we weren’t even dreaming about huge tows of grain headed to a global market!!

You might also enjoy this short video clip.

Please Santa!  Let’s start on a new lock in 2017!

Mitchell_LindsayLindsay Mitchell
ICGA/ICMB Marketing Director