KNEE HIGH BY THE 4TH OF JULY

If you took a drive down a country road, you would probably see corn and a lot of it. That is my drive to work every morning. It is a part of life in central Illinois and a scene as familiar as the leaves turning in the fall. Without a doubt, those who have grown up in this region have also heard the phrase “knee-high by the 4th of July.” Let me tell you, I could get lost in a corn field more easily than find one that meets only my knee.

Once the standard for a good corn crop was that it should be as tall at the farmer’s knee by early July. This no longer applies to a modern crop for a variety of reasons ranging from a change in planting date, a change in seed genetics, fertilizer, and increased technology. A central Illinois cornfield in early July can completely conceal my head from view. Head high just doesn’t quite have the same ring, does it?Why have we changed up the tried and true methods of the past? Simple, we know more than we did before. No longer do we have to settle growing only 20 bushels on an acre like in 1912. The national average was 175 bushels an acre in 2016. This is important because farmers are expected to feed more people than ever before, and on less land.

Why have we changed up the tried and true methods of the past? Simple, we know more than we did before. No longer do we have to settle growing only 20 bushels on an acre like in 1912. The national average was 175 bushels an acre in 2016. This is important because farmers are expected to feed more people than ever before, and on less land.With increases in technology and knowledge, scientists have been able to select varieties of corn that can be planted earlier. This allows them to grow longer and results not only in more of the beautiful golden

With increases in technology and knowledge, scientists have been able to select varieties of corn that can be planted earlier. This allows them to grow longer and results not only in more of the beautiful golden kernels but a taller crop that is definitely not just knee high. More recently, the traits can be combined with others such as drought and bug resistance in a genetically modified crop that is much hardier and can feed more than ever before.Can you imagine your house plants staying green without a little “plant food”? Neither can corn! These nutrients that the plants need to grow big and tall can now be applied in ways that were never before possible in the form of fertilizer. Corn that might have once grown short and wimpy in a location if it grew at all can now grow tall with the help of scientists and farmers applying the right kinds of fertilizers in measured amounts.

Can you imagine your house plants staying green without a little “plant food”? Neither can corn! These nutrients that the plants need to grow big and tall can now be applied in ways that were never before possible in the form of fertilizer. Corn that might have once grown short and wimpy in a location if it grew at all can now grow tall with the help of scientists and farmers applying the right kinds of fertilizers in measured amounts.Knee high by the 4th of July, while still a clever rhyme that was a once useful, simply isn’t good enough for the modern corn crop. Farmers have to up their game to feed the world. Through the use of modern technology and a careful selection of seed genetics, a farmer today feeds 155 people. As you celebrate the 4th of July, watch the fireworks from somewhere other than a cornfield, you won’t be able to see over those big green leaves.

Knee high by the 4th of July, while still a clever rhyme that was a once useful, simply isn’t good enough for the modern corn crop. Farmers have to up their game to feed the world. Through the use of modern technology and a careful selection of seed genetics, a farmer today feeds 155 people. As you celebrated the 4th of July, I hope you watched the fireworks from somewhere other than a cornfield, you wouldn’t be able to see over those big green leaves.

Shelby Carlson
IL Corn

Posted in Agriculture, Education, Field Updates, General, Who are Illinois Corn Farmers? | 2 Comments

HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY!

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MONARCH MONDAY

Here at IL Corn we’re all about protecting our state insect by establishing and protecting monarch habitats. Want to learn more and help out? Take the Monarch Challenge.

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FRIDAY FARM PHOTO: GOLF

Farmers don’t take many days off, but when we do, we like to golf.

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#TBT: RAIN CAN BE A HUGE PAIN

[Originally published June 29, 2015]

We love this parody by Ohio Ag Net’s Ty Higgins.  Rain IS a big pain all over the Midwest.

On Friday, after leaving IL Corn’s rained out golf outing, I took this quick video (below). You can see clearly see the damaged caused to this corn by standing water and inadequate drainage. The dark spots are higher ground where the corn wasn’t trying to grow in standing water. The lighter green spots are lower ground where the corn is struggling to survive.

Here’s a photo I took today on my way back to the office after lunch. See how the corn is lighter colored where it’s excessively wet?

wet field

This damage is everywhere. Farmers are starting to get nervous. THIS is one of the reasons why farming is such a risky business.

Mitchell_Lindsay
Lindsay Mitchell
ICGA/ICMB Marketing Manager

Posted in Agriculture, Climate Change, Education, Environment, Field Updates, General, Throwback Thursday, Who are Illinois Corn Farmers? | Leave a comment

SHOWING STOCK OR STAYING SOCIAL?

Without fail Father’s Day weekend includes two things in my house, a trip to the golf course with friends, their son’s, and my brother for my dad and a trip to the local fairgrounds for the annual local FFA chapter’s livestock show for me. The show is held in remembrance of a young man who passed away far too young. I was too young then to remember much about that time, but I know the family, and I will never miss a chance to support them.

Just like every year for the past six or so, I knew my job without being asked. I was to join the announcer at the stand, help keep track of what was going on and make sure the premiums got handed out to the correct people. As I walked up the show ring being wet with a sprinkler to help settle the dust, I recognized familiar members of the community setting up for their roles as well. It was comforting to be greeted by the people who had watched me grow up at those very fair grounds. I had moved a couple hours away for grad school, yet none of us thought twice about me coming home for the show.

Before long kids and animals filled the ring and our jobs started. Parents held animals for their child in the holding pen so their son or daughter could switch animals between classes. To me, this was all too familiar. I had done this all at 4-H and FFA shows for most of my life. I really hadn’t aged out of the programs that long ago and since then I have volunteered. Suddenly, this show, in particular, had new meaning to me. This is where small town support stood true.

Loyal alumni supported not only their FFA chapter but the family who had lost a beloved son so long ago. Despite the heat that had the men working the show ring sweating, I got the chills. How had nearly twenty years passed yet community support had never wavered? Then it hit me, this is a small town and that is what we do.

While the kids were busy in the ring learning the valuable lessons that could only be learned by handling livestock, the adults helping demonstrated just what those values looked like matured. The students learned about loyalty, hard work, trust, cooperation, manners, and so much more. I felt I was stuck somewhere between the two groups. I’m not ready to call myself an adult at 22 but I certainly was more mature than a high school aged kid pushing a pig around the ring. It didn’t really matter what age category I belonged to, I belonged in that small town that supported the FFA chapter and family that meant so much to me.

What was the show really about? Were we showing livestock or were we upholding social values that had been instilled in us long ago as a showman.

Shelby Carlson
IL Corn Intern

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MONDAY MOTIVATION: THE FARM IS OUR HOME

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FRIDAY FARM PHOTO: GRASS FED BEEF

Keegan Cassady
Oklahoma State University

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SIX REASONS FARMERS VISIT WASHINGTON, DC

  1. TO EXPLAIN HOW THEY LIVE: It’s no secret that every single year, more and more kids leave the farm and the rural areas where they’ve grown up for the bigger cities.  Flat out, there is just more opportunity in ST. Louis or Chicago for those young Americans.  Even if they want to stay in the ag industry, they have multiple opportunities to work for the Chicago Board of Trade or for Monsanto in the bigger cities than they do in the rural areas.  The result is that many of our legislators just don’t know what it is to live on the farm or even in a rural area.  Who better to explain farm family life to them, but farmers?
  2. FARMERS ARE LESS THAN 2 PERCENT OF THE POPULATION: And even among those 2 percent, a majority will never travel to Washington, DC and will never make an appointment to see their elected official.  It means so much to those elected officials to see real farmers in their Washington, DC offices – to have someone to ask questions of and to reflect on problems with.  Farmers really ought to visit our nation’s capital more often!
  3. TO EXPLAIN HOW POLICIES MIGHT OR MIGHT NOT WORK: Because legislators aren’t always super aware of rural life or of how to farm, they need farmers in their office to talk them through potential policy ideas.  While a farm bill is being debated, for example, farmers need to be available to point out successes or pitfalls of potential policy.  How will legislators who have never farmed understand how a policy might really work on an actual farm?
  4. TO SEE HOW THEY CAN HELP: Sometimes, legislators that really do try hard to represent their district and enact policies that make a difference need help too.  An elected official might be trying to do the right thing, but media or other non-supporters in his or her district are swinging the other way, which makes the right thing difficult.  Farmers often ask how they can help their Congressman on any potential issues in the district.  If a Congressman is genuinely trying to do the right thing for his district, farmers definitely want to help that Congressman so that he or she can remain in office.
  5. TO DONATE MONEY: It takes money to get elected into Congress and to remain in Congress.  Whether that’s right or wrong, farmers will often visit Washington, DC to donate funds to the elected officials who help them on pro-farm and pro-rural life policy initiatives.  Farmer leaders want to enable the best Congressman who try to understand agriculture and rural life to remain in office.
  6. TO BETTER UNDERSTAND THE DYNAMICS OF VARIOUS POLICY INITIATIVES: Often when farmers visit Washington, DC, they are able to meet with other national associations, companies, and think tanks to gather information and get a better picture of the dynamics influencing policy decisions.  For example, if farmers really want to pass tax reform, they need to meet with other impacted parties to determine how certain tax reforms might work for them.  Perhaps there’s a negative impact that the farmers haven’t considered and the policy idea can be changed.  Perhaps many associations are in favor of the same tax fix and they can all work together to show Congress why one idea is better than another.

When IL Corn farmer leaders travel to Washington, DC, there is almost no free time!  By the time we schedule in meetings with other interested associations and companies, by the time we background ourselves on what’s going on in Washington, DC and meet with our elected officials (all 20 of them!), and by the time we participate in fundraisers for the Congressmen who have helped us, we’re running from 6 am til 9 pm and that’s no exaggeration.

But the work farmers do in D.C. is so important to protecting farm families and rural life.

Lindsay Mitchell
ICGA/ICMB Marketing Director

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WIN FREE FUEL

You can win free fuel by reporting fuel prices of E85 and other ethanol blends on e85prices.com.

All you have to do is download the app, create an account, and start reporting the prices of the ethanol blended fuel in your area or wherever you find yourself during your scheduled summer driving.  Each time you report a price (you can report multiple prices per day) you are entered to win $50 in free fuel!

Winners are drawn every single day from Memorial Day through Labor Day and announced every two weeks.

For full contest details, click here.

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